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Your Trusted Source for Pet News and Product Reviews

A Quick Guide to Dog Grooming

Dog Grooming

Dog Grooming

Introduction

It's always a challenge; do you take your dog to the groomer and pay to leave your baby in the hands of strangers, or do you do it yourself, and save money...but perhaps don't do as good a job as a professional could?

The good news is, it's now easier than ever, with the extensive lines of products specifically for pet grooming that you can now find in almost any pet care store, to do a thorough, professional job of dog grooming yourself.

The trick is finding the right tools and supplies for the size and type of dog you have.

Does Breed Matter in Dog Grooming?

Yes and no. You won't find supplies specifically for grooming your Shih Tzu, and you don't have to have brushes with "Collie" stamped on them. But the truth is, that different dogs have different bone structures, different coat thicknesses and fur lengths, and different grooming needs.

You wouldn't use the same brush for an Old English Sheepdog that you would for a Chihuahua, for example. Taking these things into account can go long ways towards getting the right tools to do the job right at home.

Grooming at Home

Home dog grooming is one area where the sales associates at your local pet care store can be very helpful.

They should know the right tools for the job, and they can point you to the right supplies for your particular breed.

Dog grooming isn't as difficult as it might be, especially if you have a large tub or sink for washing your pet, and you're just washing and brushing your pet.

For dogs like poodles, or even, to a lesser extent, Shih Tzu, who require special trimming to stay in top form, you may be better off going to a professional groomer, especially if you aren't familiar with trimming a dog's fur.

It's easy to nip skin when you try to cut a dog's fur, and even though most breeds don't actually need their fur trimmed, those breeds that do should probably be professionally groomed.

For other pets, though, getting the right tools for the job makes dog grooming something that you can easily do well at home.

Best Dog Brushing Equipment For Dog Shedding

Dog brushing should be done regularly to keep your dog’s hair smooth and healthy, and to avoid excess dog shedding in your house. A used hairbrush in your home won’t be too helpful for your dog. You need to invest in a set of dog brushing equipment.

If you own a short-haired, double coated dog breed (with an undercoat) you need to invest in a mitt, a bristle brush, a fork comb, and a soft, horse brush. This dog brushing equipment will help you lessen dog shedding, most especially during hot weather.

Grooming Mitt

A Grooming Mitt is not actually a brush, but it is a great tool when applying conditioner on your dog’s hair. A mitt helps in loosening excess hair on the outer coat.

A fork comb, on the other hand, will help you remove tangles and mats from your dog’s hair. The clumping of hair into mats will prevent you from brushing your dog’s hair thoroughly.

Bristle Brushes

A Bristle Brush is helpful in removing excess undercoat hair. Dog brushing with a bristle brush removes fifty percent of dog shedding, so you'd better choose a durable bristle brush for this will be your ‘main’ and most used brush of all.

Bristle brush must be brushed in all directions to catch loosened hair and trim the undercoat excess.

Soft Brushes

Soft horsehair or slicker brushes both remove the last traces of loosened hair and stimulates the skin to produce more oil for the hair, thus giving your dog’s hair a shiny, well-brushed look.

For Shorter Fur

If you own a poodle or any breed that resembles a Poodle’s fur, you won’t have a need for these kinds of dog brushing equipment.

With regular hair trimming, this type of dog doesn’t shed hair much. You can do your regular dog brushing with a simple fork comb to remove tangles and a regular dog brush to smoothen the hair.

Who Should Do Your Dog Nail Clipping?

Dog nails are like human nails in a few ways. One is that they continually grow and the other is that they do need to be clipped.

Dogs that are active tend to need dog nail clipping less than others. Generally, the wear and tear of running, walking, and other activities wear the nails down naturally.

As your dog gets older and less active, you may find that dog nail clipping becomes more and more needed.

Professionals Groomers

If your dog needs its nails clipped, it is best to take it to a professional dog groomer.

They are trained and know exactly how much to take off. If you try this without any training or advice, a couple of things can happen.

You may take off too much nail, which can result in pain and even infection for your dog. You could also injure your dog by accident.

Dog nail clippers are quite sturdy tools and can cut the skin quite badly if used by someone inexperienced. You may also want to consider the fact that your dog may injure you.

Dogs generally do not like having their nails clipped. Even trained professionals get nipped every now and then.

If you make a wrong move, your dog may strike at you out of fear or pain.

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Maintenance

Despite the possible hassles, you should take you beloved in for Dog nail clipping.

Nails left unattended will continue to grow and can cause problems. Conditions similar to hangnails can develop, causing your dog lots of unnecessary pain.

Dogs can also suffer injuries and infections if their nails are left unattended for too long.

Dog nail clipping is necessary, but a dog owner really should consult a professional.

Dogs do not really like dog nail clipping and even professional suffer bites and nips from time to time. However, a dog's nails should be taken care of.

Regular dog nail clipping can prevent discomfort, injury, and infection. It will help your dog both look and feel better.

When it comes to nail clipping, definitely have it done, but hire a professional.



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